We’re not dead

Making music makes you look very silent.

You know writers that end up writing about writing? Or about not writing, or about just trying to write. Well, it’s hard to make a song about making a song. Some people I can say have succeeded in it, but not many. I don’t want to give it a try. I’d rather stick to something else. Not drumming about trying to do percussion.

Get to the point: We’ve been silent as hell, as we’ve been working our behinds off. The more you work on music, the more silent it seems to get. When you work it’s hard to keep on shouting about it.

Silence is good for our guitar hero Okko, as all the recordings are now over, and he’s concentrating on mixing and mastering the stuff the others played. He will soon be turning into wobbling pink mold in the corner of his house, as the solitude and too much mixing start to work on him.

But we have a solution: Releasing a record this spring requires other stuff, not just the music. So we’re taking Okko out of his house today, to go and see a few places for our promotional pictures, and some animals. It’s good to see animals every now and then, in between mixing and mastering. You’ll be getting a few glimpses of this process in a few days if we’re not eaten by those animals.

We’re also in the process of making a music video. Maybe several. But let’s start with one. To be honest I’d like to direct one myself. I have the right car for the great getaway scene (my friend’s old yellow car), and that’s about all I have. A Great start! Next I will need a camera.

-kili

Viva Mexico!


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I went to Mexico to my brother´s wedding and it was such an interesting trip. Now I really have a Mexican family there. On my trip I was thinking the differences between social cultures in Finland and Mexico. Like in Spain, in Mexico, the family is really an important thing and when you speak about the family you mean all your grandparents, aunts, cousins and so on. And they meet each other very often and have parties together. During the two weeks the relatives and friends often got together having a good time eating, talking and playing. In Finland the family is important too, but we don’t gather all the relatives together so often, only when we have a very good reason for that, like wedding or funeral.

Then I noticed that maybe we don´t have so big families here in Finland, but we have other groups that can be as close as family. Bajo Cero is one for me – like a family. We are really close to each other and share all the good things and bad things together. And we have also parties! A common goal in life can bring people together. Like in Family there are different personalities for our band, but that´s also the richness for our band. I´m happy about all my families in Finland and Mexico and I think the best thing people can have is to get such wonderful dear people near you. And I think I’ve got the best!

-Elina

I went to Mexico to my brother´s wedding and it was such an interesting trip. Now I really have a Mexican family there. On my trip I was thinking the differences between social cultures in Finland and Mexico. Like in Spain, in Mexico, the family is really an important thing and when you speak about the family you mean all your grandparents, aunts, cousins and so on. And they meet each other very often and have parties together. During the two weeks the relatives and friends often got together having a good time eating, talking and playing. In Finland the family is important too, but

we don’t gather all the relatives together so often, only when we have a very good reason for that, like wedding or funeral.

Birth

Eyes half open I watch as snow whirls off the front wheel of my trusted bicycle. There’s that strange fog of silence floating in the air, that you can only experience when you are out when the bars have just closed, having left home a couple of minutes ago. I decided to smoke for one evening, again, and I can feel it in the cold air grinding my lungs as I gasp and pant thrusting the pedals down. If it only hadn’t snowed tonight. I’ve got to make it there in time.

The wine I had last night slows my body down and it feels like I’m going to short circuit and shut down. The toes and fingers are probably still asleep as I’ve stayed up all night in anticipation, stress and insomnia combined into one hazy state of existence. Somehow I find the fifth gear as I think to myself: ”This is the last time I’m doing this.” And my lungs get another winter-air-whipping.

I force myself into the blinding lights of the hospital hallways and have a hard time finding the right room. Once I do, I become a total passenger. I observe a natural pain that hurts me as well because there is nothing else for me to do but hold a hand. I offer a glass of water, as if it could ever help anyone in this situation. I try to think of something supportive to say, but all that comes out are horrible cliches. Furthermore, I get told to go and stand in the far corner of the room and not have my hands in my pockets because it is irritating to look at.

Once it’s all over, I’m holding my daughter in my arms for the first time. Excitement, happiness, amazement and  love, they are some of the obvious things I don’t even have to mention. Actually, the first practical thing that comes to my mind is that if in about 15-20 years time I see any long haired musicians, especially bassists playing in some weird artistic bands, knocking on my door claiming that they’re going out with my daughter, I will have prepared well by joining a moose hunting society and will have bought a couple of rifles that I can have handy.

Giving birth is weird for men, so weird.

-Juhani

Happy New Year (how’s your timeline?)

Facebook keeps pissing people off by changing every now and then. Small changes that make things just a bit slower because you can’t find the right button, or bigger timeline changes that might reveal some silliness you burped out years ago. Why do they keep doing this, ARRRH?!

A friend of mine had solved this: the company has lots of employees that they need every now and then, but not all of the time. And the unwritten law of employees is you need to look busy even when there’s no rush, otherwise you’ll be the first to get the sack. So the employees keep fixing these changes just to show their bosses they’re doing something.

Nice theory, but I think most companies wouldn’t have a crowd of people just moving the Log Out button around once a month.

As Facebook users, we tend to think of ourselves as active individuals, rather than as a faceless mass (pun intended). But we forget the basic fact of marketing, the fact that if you’re not paying for it, you are the product. A company called Facebook is selling marketing space for other companies, and the actual product they sell is the huge mass of audience.

So making major changes like the timeline during holiday seasons is not a bad idea. It just means people spend more time in Facebook, and that means they (at least in a passive way) spend more time next to the adverts on the side bar.

For bands like ours it is still the inevitable truth, that communities like Facebook are the easiest way to keep in touch with those who want to hear us and of us. It is for example the easiest way to link this blog to hundreds of people.

Still, I think my friend Raffaello caught an important point that he shared, ha ha, of course in his Facebook status. I will finish by translating it (which is pretty funny, as he is Italian but wrote it in Finnish. But our band that sings in Spanish has a blog in English…)

“This facebook isn’t quite working anymore. It’s complicated and utterly boring. Friends, acquaintances, close friends, create a new group, filters, restricted, don’t show, show, like, oh no, don’t like. It was maybe fun years ago to find old school mates in here, but after a few messages all that is left is pictures and updates that you actually don’t know anything about. Family, kids, wives, engaged, husbands, is in a relationship, is no longer in a relationship, likes, does not like. Maybe the past being past still has a meaning: the things that go there are such things that simply have gone, to the past. And you don’t have to pick them back up with timeline. They already went.”

-kili